18.06.2014

Nature highlights the growth of Argentine science

Argentina and Brazil lead the collaborative research. The prestigious magazine devoted its June issue to the scientific development in South America.

Nature highlights the growth of Argentine science

"South America in numbers." Source: Nature.

Nature, the prestigious journal devotes its June issue to describe the research overview of South America. In a complete special report, the publication covers research advances in Argentina, Brazil, Chile, Colombia, Venezuela and Peru as major players in the region. This magazine compares the number of publications, international collaborations, impact of papers, research expenditures, number of researchers and patents obtained.

Argentina has the highest proportion of researchers with nearly 3 per 1,000 workers, surpassing China and just below the United States

Brazil tops the number of publications in the region with 46,306 during 2013 followed by Argentina with 9,337 However, the impact of Argentine publications, which measures the number of times an article is cited by others and the number of publications, grew by about 1.1 widely surpassing Brazil and slightly to the world average. Moreover, the average publications per capita in Brazil is similar to Argentina, Chile and Uruguay In regard to the number of researchers, although Brazil has a staff of over 100,000, almost two-thirds of the total of South America, Argentina has the highest proportion of researchers with nearly 3 per 1,000 workers, surpassing China and just below the United States. The report, which was also included on the website of the BBC the British channel, also emphasizes that Brazil and Argentina lead the binational collaborative research with over 3,000 projects between the two countries.

The Nature’s June issue also publishes ten opinion columns of prestigious South American scientists. Among them, Lino Barañao, Minister of Science, Technology and Productive Innovation, noted that "after a decade of policies designed to promote research, the Argentine science begins to have a positive impact on economic and social development. Now greater involvement from the private sector is required”. Thus, Barañao makes reference to South America which, compared to big countries of the world, presents a low rate of registered patents. This is because, according to Nature, the higher part of investment in science is provided by the government while private companies show a deficit in research and development.

Regarding the ongoing investigations, Nature highlights in Argentina the line of study conducted by the molecular biologist Alberto Kornblihtt, describing the method of the RNA modification through alternative splicing and the magazine qualifies as "world-class science". With regard to science policy, the magazine recognizes the increased investment in science and technology, reaching 0.65% of GDP, the repatriation programme of scientists, where pays special attention to the case of Andrea Bragas the nanoscientist and the creation of the first office of the Max Planck Society in South America thanks to the construction of the Institute for Research in Biomedicine of Buenos Aires (IBIOBA - CONICET - MPSP) in the Science and Technology Cluster. The IBIOBA is led by molecular biologist Dr. Eduardo Arzt who also marks within the same report, the achievements of science Argentina in international collaboration such as the recent association of the country to the European Molecular Biology Laboratory (EMBL).

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"South America in numbers." Source: Nature.

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